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medalist, sacha cohen. first this is "today" on nbc. >> announcer: "today" at the rink is brought to you by smucker's. with a name like smuckers, it has to be good. >> this morning on "today" at the rink, silver silver medalist sasha cohen joins us and will skate for us. good morning to you. >> good morning. it's freezing. >> it is. you should be used to that as a skater. >> this is a little bit below that. >> you've been busy since then, skating and other things. >> i'm attending columbia university, launched my own line of skates. promoting at nationals this weekend. and just busy. >> u.s. championships are this weekend. you are a former u.s. champion. anybody you have your eye on? >> ashley wagner is a strong favorite. she trained with my old coach and i'll definitely be rooting for her this weekend. >> tell me about this special, ba barry manilow is the inspiration? >> yes. never had such fun skating to a live artist. don't miss it. it's great. >> training for the olympics, but obviously this is something very important to you. >> i've been skating every day for years, which i love.
a public health emergency. elizabeth cohen joins us now. what do health officials mean when they use the word epidemic? >> it gets very technical. i'll boil it down here. basically, people are getting sick and dying from the flu in certain numbers. when those numbers get high enough, we call it an epidemic. i personally don't really care that much about that word. i'll tell you why. the flu season nearly always reaches epidemic levels. even if it's just like a moderate plain old, you know, normal season. so i think we shouldn't get focused too much on that word. we instead should focus on what we're seeing here which is what can you do to avoid getting the flu which is getting a flu shot and doing things like washing your hands and staying away from people who look sick. john? >> it doesn't feel like just a normal flu season here. i have to tell you. a lot of people sick here in the office. a lot of people sick where i live. governor cuomo declared a public health emergency. so since we're talking about terminology, what does that mean? >> let me go back to what you said before. this
out nationwide. we will talk more about this flu and the spread coming up with elizabeth cohen in the next hour. >> is it too late to get a flu vaccine? >> never too late. >>> vice president biden revealing the white house is prepared to bypass congress to push through tough new gun control laws. that announcement coming hours before today's talks between biden's gun violence commission and gun rights groups, including the national rifle association. it is shaping up to be a long day for the vice president. later this morning he meets with sportsmen and wildlife groups. this afternoon it's representatives from gun owners groups, including the nra. tonight the entertainment industry weighs in on how violence in the media may be influencing the problem. when it is all said and done biden acknowledges his boss is prepared to use the powers of the presidency to enact his own comprehensive gun control plan. >> the president is going to act. there are executive orders, executive action that can be taken. we have not decided what that is yet. we are compiling it all with the help of t
about any measure, steve cohen is a financial superstar, amazing success at picking stocks has made him one of the richest, most powerful stars on wall street. now his reputation and his empire may be in jeopardy. a federal criminal investigation appears to have him in the crosshairs. whenever the stock market is open, you usually can find steve cohen here, at the center of the football field-sized trading floor in connecticut, home to his hedge fund. for almost two decades, he has wracked up 20% to 30% annual return for his investors, losing money only one year, leading one magazine to dub him the most brilliant hedge fund manager alive. >> he is viewed as one of the top, top traders that has ever, ever worked on wall street. >> reporter: and does he live large, worth about $9 billion, he owns this lavish estate with a 36,000-square hp foot house and holes for golf. his art collection is valued at almost $1 billion, with works by van gogh and andy warhol. >> the edge he has gotten is not just from his own insight but perhaps from other means that are not legal. >> reporter: so far, fed
. >>> better news this morning about the flu. cnn's elizabeth cohen got a look at new numbers out from the cdc, numbers set to officially be released later today. the number of cases are actually down with 24 states reporting high levels of flu last week, compared to 29 the week before. however, there were two more pediatric deaths, bringing the total to 20 and by pediatric deaths we mean children of course. in chicago, flu patients are overwhelming the city's already strained hospitals though with still quite the outbreak there. here's cnn's ted rowlands. >> no nausea at this point. >> reporter: deborah cross started feeling sick on monday, three days later she ended up in the emergency room at cook county hospital in chicago, where it was so busy, she had to wait four hours to be seen. >> decided to be safe and come here make sure that everything was okay. >> reporter: several hospitals in chicago this week were forced to reject patients for several hours because of so many flu cases. on monday, 11 different hospitals in the chicago area couldn't handle any more patients. non-life-threatenin
to discuss this here today. brian cohen is here on the set with us. he's the chairman of new york angels a group that has invested more than $50 million in 70 early stage technology companies and the ceo of a launch dot public relations platform and guy okay with a guy kawaski and author of 12 books. good to see you guys. so, brian, you sitting on the set, we're both watching this story and just shaking our heads when she said that one-third, one-third, one-third. her adviser said it keep 51%. it's as easy as that, right? >> no, it's not. it really depends on the kind of business it is. i'm unusual because i married my partner and the best part of that is that she challenged me all the time and she was 50% and i was 50%. but we both went into it with that absolute trust. and that relationship that we had between us of challenging each other isn't normal in most business relationships as partners because they are always trying to figure each other out. i think the nature of the success of a great partnership is when you go into with it a rigor, a rigor you want to challenge each other. a
after you see how many calories are packed into some popular restaurants. elizabeth cohen is live in atlanta. how many calories are we talking about? >> an enormous amount. in one dish, you're getting calories should you get in an entire day. i think americans expect fast food is high caloried. i think you don't get that even in a nice restaurant, sometimes you're getting even more calories. take a look at two dishes. this one right here is cheesecake factory he's bistro shrimp pasta. 3120 calories. >> did you say 3,000? >> yes. that's a 3. yes, you heard that right. and you're supposed to get about 2200 calories a day. so it's way more than you're supposed to have in an entire day. as a matter of fact, that one dish is the equivalent calorie-wise of 5 1/2 big macs. you would never sit down and eat 5 1/2 big macs, but that's what's in this dish. and let me show you another one. this is called veal porter house and crispy red potatoes and that has 2710 calories. again, more than you're supposed to have in an entire day. it is the equivalent of three pints of ben and juerry's ice cr
cohen on the program yesterday and he thinks the republicans just aren't going to introduce it in the house. so did you get a sense talking to the players at the white house how hard they're going to push, and what the chance of succeeding are? >> like he said, this is not a short-term thing. this is a long haul we're in for. even from day one after the shooting in newtown connecticut, we have to change our understanding of how to deal with these things. instead of going to capitol hill and lobbying, we've been going to people saying they're the missing piece in gun violence. it's the sustained engagement that has not been there for a number of years that needs to be there in order for elected officials from both parties to step forward. because of what we've seen already it's been a month since the shooting in connecticut our phones have been hanging off the hook activists are coming to us every day marchs planned across the country that is allowing senator casey senator warner to step up and say things we never heard before. americans are playing the most vital role in thi
expert aaron cohen says they shouldn't get u.s. aid. but it does, even now, why? >> well, i mean, neil... problem is we are sending millions if not billions of dollars into libya. the aid needs to be cut off. the reason why is because the attack that we saw -- this natural gas factory or refinery, which happens to sit on the libyan border, the weapons that were recovered by the algerian security forces were the exact same collection of kalashnikov rifles and the belgian-made land mieps and the c-5 rocket launchers, made famous by the libyan militias, these exact models were recovered by the algerian security forces, which means they came from the stockpiles amassed by momar cadoffy and looted by arms traffickers and are freely moving back and forth on this north african border, which is completely wide open for traffickers and militias,. >> neil: leaving aside our pouring good money after bad, in which we have committed tens of billions of dollars and in the case of egypt, then give mon tote new government that hates us even more, i am wondering, in light of today's developments from b
widespread this epidemic has become? we're going to talk with elizabeth cohen at the top of the hour. would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. >>> our starting point one month later, we're live this morning from newtown, connecticut, marking one month since 20 first graders and 6 staffers were gunned down inside the sandy hook elementary school. this morning we take a look at how the community is coping today and their plans to help prevent another tragedy. >>> then a flu especialpidemic widespread across 47 states with vaccines running low. where we stand and what you need to know to protect you and your family. >>> plus hollywood celebrates its own at the golden globe awards. we've got the surprises and the
-old boy is wondering how this common treatable virus could take the life of their son. elizabeth cohen is joining us. she spent the morning with the family. elizabeth, how did this happen? >> reporter: wolf, it was such an emotional morning. i'm in front of the church that the family attends. mack was 17. that personified who he was. as you said, perfectly healthy. on december 21st he started feeling sick, a headache, a little bit tired. he had a fever but really no big deal and he was better in about two days and he then he felt fine for a while. and then a couple days later he started feeling bad again. his parents took him to a local hospital in the rural area they were in and they said he's got the flu and his kidneys are failing. they said, we have to get him to a bigger hospital. they put him on a helicopter and this is what max said to his mother as he was getting on the helicopter. >> one of the last coherent things he said, he looked at me and tears were rolling down his face. >> he was scared. >> he said, mom, i'm scared. i said, i know, buddy. i am, too. he said, mom, it's g
: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? mr. cohen: to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman ask for unanimous consent? mr. cohen: i do indeed. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for one minute. mr. cohen: thank you, mr. speaker. we've heard from a colleague of mine on the democratic side who sounds like he's not going to vote for this provision and we heard from a couple folks from the other side. i'm going to vote for it, not because i think it's all the best, sugar and spice and everything nights, but because for one thing, i believe our president and our vice president know what they can get in a negotiated deal with the republican side in the senate and what might pass this house as well. and they know what our country needs. and my district can't afford to wait a few days and have the stock market go down 300 points tomorrow if we don't get together and do something and people in my district need unemployment compensation and they need to know in the future
cohen was a republican senator before he was bill clinton's secretary of defense. >> i think he'll face the same challenge in terms of people on the democratic side saying, hey, wait, we've got some pretty talented people that are -- could step in in a moment's notice and fill that spot, and the republicans will say why are you helping out a democratic administration? >> reporter: one key republican already is challenging hagel. >> i am concerned about many of the comments that he made and has made like reference to, quote, jewish lobby, which i don't believe exists. i believe a pro-israel lobby exists. >> reporter: others insist hague sel not anti-israel. >> he belongs to a tough-minded in this case republican view of israel that, in fact, accepts the reality that while the united states and israel are very close allies and will remain close allies, their views on every issue cannot be expected to coincide. >> reporter: and critics in the gay and lesbian community have turned around their opposition to hagel. in 1998 hagel opposed james hormel, an openly gay man, to an ambassador's pos
, vice president of the national fair housing alliance. then alys cohen, staff attorney for the national consumer law center. and then if i move all the way to my right inside, susan wachter who is a professor for state and finance at wharton school at the university of pennsylvania. david moskowitz is deputy general counsel at wells fargo, and karen thomas, senior executive vice president of government relations at the independent community bankers association of america. thank you all for being here. and perhaps we might start with you, mr. calhoun. >> thank you. today, the cfpb announces one of its most important rules, a qualified mortgage ability-to-repay rule, along with the upcoming mortgage servicing rules that will come out next week, address failures in the mortgage market, the devastated -- a devastating millions of families and our overall economic. twin drivers of this were widespread, unaffordable loans, and a broken mortgage servicing system that severely aggravated the ensuing wave of foreclosures. the goal of the dodd-frank legislation, the rule today, our to redirect in
issues. >> woodruff: but tennessee democrat steve cohen warned about the consequences of not taking the senate deal. >> my district can't afford to wait a few days and have the stock market go down 300 points tomorrow if we don't get together and do something. >> woodruff: later house democratic leaders emerged from a nearly three-hour meeting with vice president biden, who helped broker the senate deal. minority leader nancy pelosi called for action. >> we look forward now as we go forward in this day to see what the timing will be for a straight up-or-down vote on what passed 89-8 last night in the united states senate. >> woodruff: house republicans also met and gave no sign they were ready to call a vote on the senate bill. instead majority leader eric cantor said he won't support the measure. and others left open the possibility of changing the bill. and sending it back to the senate. >> woodruff: the story at this hour still unfolding at the house but all signs are pointing to a vote on the senate compromise later tonight. we get an update now froms in regular todd zwillich. h
issues. >> woodruff: tennessee democrat steve cohen warned about the consequences of not taking the senate deal. >> my district can't afford to wait a few days and have the stock market go down 300 points tomorrow if we don't ghettoing and do something. >> woodruff: later house democratic leaders emerged from a nearly three-hour meeting with vice president biden who helped broker the senate deal. minority leader nancy pelosi called for action. >> we look forward now as we go forward in this day to see what the timing will be for a straight up-or-down vote on what passed 89-8 last night in the united states senate. >> woodruff: house republicans also met and gave no sign they were ready to call a vote on the senate bill. instead majority leader eric cantor said he won't support the measure. and others left open the possibility of changing the bill. and sending it back to the senate. so how will the twists and turns play out? we turn to newshour regular todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international, and was there for the senate vote
. scott cohen is here with the story and ways to protect yourself more importantly. hi, scott. >> this is a crime of choice for identity thieves. they see it as easy to commit tough to enforce and it is hell on victims. >> that's her in my dress. >> for terry and stephanie, it was an ep log to their worst nightmare. >> it was awful. >> still mourning the death of their 5-month-old daughter, katelynn, they filed their tax return but the irs rejected it. someone else already claimed katelynn as a dependent. >> felt violated. >> and the very last time we today claim her as our own. >> tax identity theft, virtually unheard of, a few years ago, is exploding. total cost more than $5 billion. in alabama, the owners of this tax preparation business admitted stealing hundreds of identities aeb millions of dollars in refunds. in florida, police are breaking up parties, featuring lessons on tax identity theft. they believe crooks got katelynn's identity from a social security death file. public record. >> anyone who dies goes on this list. >> at the justice department, tax division, wher
with his family and all of a sudden became very ill. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen spoke to his parents about their son's final days. >> the family was getting ready for a joyful christmas when on december 31st, 17-year-old son max started feeling sick. tired, fever. >> he never really got like super sick. >> two days later he was feeling better. played in the snow on vacation in wisconsin. celebrated christmas with his family. but christmas night, max felt sick again. >> excessive like 104.9 fever. we could not break it. >> the next morning, his parents took max to the hospital. where he was diagnosed with the flu. >> within 30 minutes, i mean the doctor was like something really wrong here. his kidneys are starting to fail. >> max was rushed by helicopter to a larger hospital. >> one of the last coherent things he said he looked at me and there were tears rolling down his face. >> he was scared >> he said, mom, i'm scared. >> i said i know, buddy. i am, too. then he saw me crying. he said mom, it's going to be okay. you're going to be okay. i love you. and that's really
to the hospital. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us by phone from louisville, texas. we have you on the phone because we know you're working on a flu story about kids. give us a preview. >> it's a terrible story of a completely healthy 17-year-old boy who got the flu, you know, kids get the flu, it happens, but it did not, he got very sick, very quickly and unfortunately, he ended up passing away, and this is what sometimes happens with kids. kids can look completely fine, and in less than 24 hours, or about 24 hours later that child is on a respirator in the intensive care unit, and a lot of these kids are just completely healthy kids with no underlying health problems and we don't know why most kids are okay with the flu. they're sick for a little while and get better. some of them die, we just don't know why. >> is it too late to get a flu vaccine to protect our kids, to protect ourselves? >> it isn't too late. that's one of two things i'll tell parents to do, to be empowered parents. this is so crucial. one, get your child the flu shot. we heard that people are still
autism lost their symptoms as they grew older. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen here to talk to me about this study. first, just explain the study. >> it is fascinating because it turns conventional wisdom on its head. doctors thought you can't outgrow autism once you're diagnosed, that's it. you have it. these researchers found 34 kids who were diagnosed with autism by good doctors who know what they're doing as very young kids before the age of 5, and then they -- years later when they looked at them, they didn't have any signs of autism. they were examined and the signs were gone. >> so how is this even possible? >> a couple of things going on. they found in some ways this group of kid had somewhat milder autism to begin with, that's one thing. it could also have something to do with the early intervention that these kids got, some of the training and the schooling and what have you, the therapy these kids got. and it also might have something to do with the children's individual brains. maybe there was something about their brains. and researchers have told me, you know,
identify whether or not they have this thing. elizabeth cohen in atlanta. why is this one so nasty this time around, elizabeth? >> soledad, it is the perfect storm for this particular stomach bug. so let's go over the three things that make this one really bad. first of all this particular strain, so new, it's called the sydney 2012. first spotted in sydney just last year, we're not immune to it. our bodies haven't seen it before. it comes on full force. highly contagious. just need one or two particles of this virus to get you sick. and a lot of people get this illness, they are contagious, but symptom free. they are not sick. running around making the rest of us sick. >> so disgusting. you know how i feel about those people. elizabeth cohen, thank you. listen, she and i agree on the purell thing. >>> the southeast getting a dose of the deep freeze with snow, freezing rain and dangerous ice expected from the carolinas to tennessee. even farther south. drivers in nashville, told don't travel if you don't have to. out west, the rare sight of freezing rain forced the runways at salt
virus that has some awful symptoms. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen is here with us. what is this sydney 2012? >> sydney 2012 is a strain of something called norovirus, which a lot of people call smum fl stomach flu, not the right terminology, but icky for want of a better phrase. we're talking about forceful vomiting. we're talking diarrhea. it is really not pleasant. >> yeah. something you don't want to go to work with. nobody wants this. how do we stop this from coming into our bodys? >> you know, to some extent you can't. it is incredibly contagious. if you're sick now and god forbid you were vomiting, i would be in real trouble. wash your hands a lot with soap and water. you can use an alcohol-based sterilizer but you should be doing soap and water. wash down surfaces and remember that even after you're better, you can still be contagious. and so don't cook for other people for a little while, or if you do, be really careful. >> this is what i find fascinating. i could have it and give it to other people and not even know it. >> exactly. some people have this virus, b
at the rink" olympic silver medallist sasha cohen joins us and is going to skate for you. >> good morning. it's freezing. >> it's cold for a skater. >> it is. we're used to 35. it's quite below this. >> in 2005 you've won silver. you've been busy skating doing other things. what are you up to? >> i'm attending columbia university. i just have my own line of skates which i'm promoting at nationals. i'm busy loving new york. >> obviously u.s. championships are this weekend. you are a former u.s. champion. anybody you have your eyes on. >> i think ashley wagner is a strong favorite. she trains with my old coach and i'll definitely be rooting for her. >> tell me about the special. barry manilow? >> yes, pandora's unbelievable show. it's this sunday, nbc at 1:00 p.m. don't miss it. >> how much skating do you do now? nothing like training for the olympics. this is something really important for you? >> i've been skating almost every day which i love. people, they're like my family. nothing gets your heart rate up like skating. i try to get out here when i can. >> let's see if our heart rates get up
a tough l.a. cop who takes on notorious mob boss, mickey cohen. >> nobody will ever know what we've done. no medals. no promotion. but i'm here to tell you, there's death in it, waiting for the man who hesitates. right now, our only advantage is that he won't know who we are. so, i have only one rule in this outfit. leave these at home. we're not solving a case here. we're going to war. >> guess some trouble's coming with josh brolin right there. >> we're going to war. i'll i see when i look at that, is a guy that had to get up at 4:30 in the morning and workout. and after work, had to workout. and had to look like that. like clint eastwood. >> i love the look. you did say, and i read this, you felt a real personal connection to this movie and this part. >> i wanted to. it's not that i do. the guy has incredible integrity. incredible honor. i hope that i do. i aspire to be a guy like this. >> this is a real good guy. >> this is a real good guy. and sean penn's a real bad guy. not personally, but professionally. it's nice to have this shakespearean good/bad thing going. it's a different k
's bring in panel defense panel. lisa cohen. fox news legal analyst. this is all the work of mayor bloomberg. also known as nanny bloomberg. he loves to tell everybody what to do. what to eat and drink because is he smarter than everybody else. has he now crossed the line. 16-ounce sugary drink is banned? >> i mean, there is really no link between the soft drink -- let's say that soft drinks. there is lots of other drinks that are sugary but aren't banned. talking about sodas. what about vitamin drinks? there is so much flaw in the ban to begin with. it really doesn't rise to the level of legitimacy for it actually to hold water. >> gregg: this law when you look at it appears to be as fickle and fictitious. for example it doesn't include grocery stores. it doesn't include convenience stores. mercedes pointed out 7/11 home of the big gup is not included. unsweetened juice, milk braced drinks. doesn't the law demand fairness in equity? >> can i see what those points, why there is a disparity between the small businesses and the larger 7/11s. if someone doesn't want to buy it. if the
cohen is a neurologist at the institute of st. luke's hospital here. welcome. >> thank you. >> we know lighting causes headaches. there are a whole range of other things but is weather one of them? >> yeah. so a lot of patients with migraines will notice headaches are worse before a storm rolls in they'll start to feel the headaches as the pressure changes. we think the bear metric pressure is the cause of the headaches. >> millions of americans have debilitating headaches. what causes migraines? >> it's a jeannette ek disorder. they're actually born with it. at some point in their life they get it. for women it's around the menstrual period. other things can bring it on including stressful life events head trauma can start the headaches. >> if you have a migraine what should you do? >> there are a lot of didn't treatments available for migraine. oftentimes patients will start with over-the-counter medications but most will need prescription medications that are specifically targeted toward the changes in the brain that happen during a migraine. >> i told yo
's leading beverage company, we can play an important role. >> very interesting. elizabeth cohen joining us now. what is the meaning of this new ad campaign. >> they haven't said a lot about obesity even though people have harangued them saying, wait a second, you're selling this product that might be contributing to obesity. they're trying to say, look, we're aware of this problem and we're doing our part. for example they point out we're selling smaller sizes of coke, 7.5 ounces instead of 12. they say we have nearly 200 lee-calorie and no-calorie products. they also say we're starting to put our calories, you can see it right here on the silver band, 140 calories so you know what you're getting. so they say that they're really trying to help people make choices. they're encouraging exercise and they really hopes this sort of quiets down some of their critics. >> we've been talking about america's obesity problems for years and years. and soda, consumption, i believe, has been going downer of the the last several years f my question is then how responsible is soda really? >> if you look a
life. our senior medical correspondent, elizabeth cohen, is joining us with these surprising results. elizabeth, this is so counterintuitive. help us understand what is going on here. >> right, wolf. well, we're told lose weight to be healthier, but what this study of more than 3 million people found was when they were overweight, they actually seemed to live a bit, not a lot, but seemed to live a bit longer. it may be because weight is not quite as important as we think. there may be other things that are also important. so the lesson here may be, know your weight, but in addition, know what your blood pressure is. know what your cholesterol level is. know what your glucose is. and also, keep your weight, if you can, in the right places. distribution matters. it's worse around the belly. so it may be that these overweight people, that many of them all these numbers and all that distribution was just fine, they were just kind of overweight. >> what is -- what do they consider being overweight? >> right. let's take a look at these numbers. and this comes from something called the body
, like when william cohen. can you compare when william cohen was nominated as a republican by a democratic president as opposed to senator hagel? >> we've heard republicans say that chuck hagel ceased being a republican several years ago. they were concerned when he voted against -- remember, he voted against the iraq surge. he was against it. he differed from the bush administration on a number of things and i think a lot of republicans feel that he sort of left the party a while back. >> brian: jennifer griffin at the white house for a very good reason. news secretary of defense is going to be nominated today. thanks. >> gretchen: another controversial issue was general mccrystal. remember over in afghanistan he was leading the charge there and he gave an interview to the rolling stone magazine. in that, there were many revelations about how he felt about president obama and his administration. subsequently, mccrystal did resign. >> brian: i will say this, he was never quoted, criticizing the administration. others were saying that's how he felt. but he never blamed anybo
. now cnn medical correspondent elizabeth cohen has the top five most calorie-laden items out there. and some of them may surprise you. >> wolf, when you see some of these calorie counts, your eyes are going to pop out. because some of these dishes are more calories in the one dish than you're supposed to have in the entire day. so let's do a countdown. this is from the center for science in the public interest. on their list, number five, uno's chicago grill, deep dish macaroni and three cheese. 1,980 calories. now, to put that in perspective, you're supposed to have about 2,000 calories a day and you're getting almost all of that in one dish. number four, johnny rockets bacon cheddar double burger with sweet potato fries, 2,360 calories. and at number three, from the cheesecake factory, crispy chick yn costaletta, a whopping 2,610 calories. number two, veal porterhouse with crispy red potatoes. looks pretty simple, no cream sauce or anything, 2,710 calories. and coming in at number one on the extreme eating list, the cheesecake factory's bistro shrimp pasta. it's because that shri
complications and even death. cnn senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen spoke to a mom who saved her son's life by fast action. >> reporter: darius carr is so sick with the flu, he's in the hospital. he could have died if not for the quick thinking of his mother. robbie perry was keeping a close eye on her son at home. he didn't seem all that sick. then suddenly wednesday night -- >> he couldn't hardly breathe. he was, you know, gasping for, you know, breath, and that was real scary because i thought he was going to pass out at any minute. >> reporter: robbie immediately brought her 7-year-old son to the emergency room. it's just a short drive away, but by the time they got there darius was incoherent. how did you feel in your heart when your own son didn't know who you were? >> you don't want to think the worst but as
correspondent elizabeth cohen is in texas, one of the hardest hit states. >> reporter: wolf, kids are especially vulnerable to the flu. and parents need to be really vigilant. i spent the day yesterday with one mom who got her son help in the nick of time. >> reporter: darius is so sick with the flu, he's in the hospital. he could've died if not for the quick thinking of his mother. she was keeping a close eye on her son at home. he didn't seem all that sick, then suddenly wednesday night -- >> he couldn't hard breathe. he was, you know, gasping for, you know, breath and that was real scary because i thought he was going to pass out at any minute. >> she immediately brought her 7-year-old son to the emergency room. by the time they got there, darius was incoherent. >> how did you feel in your heart when your own son didn't know who you are? >> you don't want to think the worst, but as a parent, you can't help it, you know. >> the flu had struck darius hard. his asthma making it even worse. doctors had to give him oxygen. he's recovering here at cook children's hospital in ft. worth, texas. so be
the sasha baron cohen thing going. we'd love to hear from you. >>> mary thompson has more for us. >> shares of western digital, top performer in the s&p 500 right now. just up over 4%. it reports earnings tomorrow. today getting a bit of a lift from an addition to the portfolio of storage products for small and medium size businesses. again, this is coming off a nice run for a lot of these storage companies, since november. some optimism on earnings as well. the rival sea gate technology reporting strong sales. a positive forecast when it reported earlier this month. back to you guys. >> thanks a lot, mary. the when we come back, the coo of las vegas sands on the state of gaming and the bets his company is making overseas. we're back in a minute. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] time and sales data. split-second stats. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ it's so close to the options floor... [ indistinct shouting, bell dinging ] ...you'll bust your brain box. ♪ all on thinkorswim from td ameritrade. ♪ >>> good morning. welcome back to los angeles to the wor
. wolf. >> elizabeth cohen with that report, thank you. >>> we can guarantee a harbaugh will coach the winning team in the super bowl. one of the best stories in the super bowl, even if the two coaches don't want to talk about it we're all having such a great year in the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in tot
, they need amazon. i still -- listen, kim cohen on last week, still a good story. the real estate investment companies have not been amazon, so to speak, because there are still a lot of new players that want to come in. amazon is just a phenomena. and so many people bet against it. and it has been a terrible bet. >> even with sales tax being paid in many jurisdictions. it was a concern for so long, but it doesn't seem to -- >> it was a bear. >> we should point out before we get to bob pisani, lumina shares down about 9% this morning. the chairman saying at -- roach, excuse me, which we knew had made a hostile bid afforded by lumina last year. that laroche saying they had no interest at this point in pursuing that acquisition. you may recall, those shares rallied sharply towards the end of the year on a french newspaper report that at the time i said i was completely unfamiliar with anything going on there -- >> you said, don't trust it. which was a great call. >> thanks. >> do not trust it. >> it did move the stock up a lot. a lot of that and more being taken out today on that news on i ill
. >> we're going to continue this conversation. coming up cohen and company voice chairman thomas strauss is going to join us to discuss what he's expecting from the markets in 2013. plus how is small business feeling about the state of the economy? national federation of independent business is going to be releasing its latest survey and we've got chief economist to break down those numbers. at 1:45, the aflac duck was brought in with multiple lacerations to the wing and a fractured beak. surgery was successful, but he will be in a cast until it is fully healed, possibly several months. so, if the duck isn't able to work, how will he pay for his living expenses? aflac. like his rent and car payments? aflac. what about gas and groceries? aflac. cell phone? aflac, but i doubt he'll be using his phone for quite a while cause like i said, he has a fractured beak. [ male announcer ] send the aflac duck a get-well card at getwellduck.com. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared informati
because -- >> that's right. >> you and google idea director jerry cohen are publishing a book called "the new digital age." can you give us an idea or preview on what the book is going to cover? i presume some of the things you have been talking about. >> we sat down over the last 18 mont, traveled around the world and talked to people about where they thought technology was going and more importantly, how society would adapt to it, a we came to the end of the book with a very optimistic view of this. a simple way of thinking about it, let's go back to the economist. it covers dictators, economic problems, corruption, technological innovation, health care issues and general sort of things. >> a google occasionally. >> last week. >> yes, we were on the cover and covered us as well. so let's go through each of those. how to you solve the back dictator problem? you empower the simpsons. unless the dictator is willing to some out down the internet and shoot everybody can they're getting desperate enough to do, it puts a real check and balance, even china which is certainly not an elected coun
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